Archive for the ‘Political Advertisements’ Category

First Report: TV, Broadsheets Covered Most Well Known Candidates for Senator in First Two Weeks of the Campaign (Feb. 12-24, 2013)

Wednesday, March 20th, 2013 |

Given the special nature of the 2013 campaign and elections, and in general, the role of elections in the making of Philippine democracy, the media’s role as credible and critical sources of information and analysis during the election season bears watching.

The Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR) is monitoring the news media coverage of the 2013 campaign and elections in the context of both the special circumstances in which they are taking place, and the opportunity for improved and meaningful reporting and analysis the exercise offers to the Philippine media.

From Feb. 12 to 24, CMFR monitored the major publications and television news programs for their election coverage. The newspapers covered were Manila Bulletin, the Philippine Daily Inquirer, and The Philippine Star. CMFR monitored the following TV programs: 24 Oras (GMA-7), Aksyon (TV5), Newslife (PTV 4), Solar Network News (Solar TV), and TV Patrol (ABS-CBN). CMFR is also reviewing the coverage of other newspapers, TV news and public affairs programs, and news websites as part of its regular media monitor.

To know more about the project and its findings, please visit http://www.cmfr-phil.org/mediaandelections.


The news media coverage of print and television during the first two weeks of the 2013 midterm elections was mostly focused on the rivalry between the senatorial candidates of Team PNoy, the administration party, and the opposition United Nationalist Alliance (Team UNA). But also emphasized was the involvement of the then three common candidates of both Team PNoy and Team UNA: Loren Legarda, Francis Escudero, and Grace Poe-Llamanzares.

Senatorial elections

This year’s midterm polls will see candidates fighting for local, party-list, congressional, and senatorial elections. But the press coverage of the elections primarily focused on the campaign for senator.

Out of 144 stories on the elections, 87 were about the senatorial elections. The log-book reporting type of following the candidates in their sorties—a usual feature of election reporting—marked the first two weeks of the coverage. The news reports were about the proclamation rallies and campaign sorties of both Team PNoy and Team UNA. The reports usually indicated where the event was held, the candidates present and missing, the reasons behind the decision to conduct a rally in the province, and the next step in the itinerary.

Reports about “campaign conduct” accounted for 35 percent of the coverage. Excessive coverage however was given the three common candidates of the two warring senatorial lineups who were later dropped by Team UNA as candidates: Escudero, Legarda, and Poe-Llamanzares.

The first two weeks were also marked by accusations and counteraccusations between Teams PNoy and UNA.

Despite it seeming completeness, the coverage lacked efforts to report on all the senatorial candidates to the public, especially those who are running from minor political parties or as independents. These candidates as well as their platforms and advocacies were hardly mentioned, let alone reported in any depth. Those senatorial candidates running under Teams PNoy and UNA were lopsidedly the subjects of the news reports.

Also overlooked in the daily news coverage were development and policy issues.

Elections in general

Aside from the campaign strategies of the parties, covered in print and broadcast were the election rules, violations, voters’ education efforts and other Commission on Elections (COMELEC)-related issues such as the disqualification cases against candidates from political dynasties and concerns about the automated elections. This year’s midterm polls will be just the second time the Philippines will have nationwide automated elections.

The press also provided a number of reports on violations of campaign rules, such as the illegal display of posters, Ma. Ana Consuelo “Jamby” Madrigal’s controversial iPad contest, vote-buying, and election gun ban issues. The press did explain the rules on campaign materials, what items are considered election bribes, and the actions to be taken against the violators.

For example, last Feb. 12, both 24 Oras and TV Patrol explained COMELEC’s rules and regulations on where election posters can be displayed. The Star last Feb. 16 (“Gift Giving or Vote Buying” also reported on COMELEC guidelines against vote buying.

Election specials

The TV news programs also included excerpts from their various election specials and public affairs programs. These news excerpts were from ABS-CBN 2’s Kampanya Serye, GMA-7’s Eleksyon 2013, PTV-4’s Hatol ng Bayan, Solar Network News’s Election 2013, and TV5’s Pagbabago 2013.

The three broadsheets had special sections for their reports on the elections: “Campaign Briefs” (Star), “Election News” (Bulletin), and “Vote 2013″ (Inquirer).

“Campaign Briefs” gave readers an idea of the platforms of various senatorial bets. However, the information was limited and hardly in-depth. Readers who would have wanted more information about the candidates’ platforms will need to look for other sources. Solar Network News has a separate segment called “Inform in 100” which seeks to educate voters in 100 days about 100 different election-related issues from the history of elections to narco-politics in the country and many others. Stories in this segment were supported by research and contributions from historians and political experts.

Subjects and sources

Prominent as subjects and sources of information in both the broadsheets and TV were the senatorial candidates from Teams PNoy and UNA. The top sources cited were UNA spokesperson Toby Tiangco, and the so-called “three kings of UNA”—Former president Joseph Estrada (who is currently running as Manila mayor), Vice President Jejomar Binay and Senate President Juan Ponce Enrile. The top administration sources were President Benigno Aquino III and Team PNoy spokesperson Miro Quimbo.

COMELEC chair Sixto Brillantes and spokesperson James Jimenez also landed as top news sources.

Slant

Overall, the coverage was largely neutral. There were some exceptions, however. For example, in a Feb. 13 article (“Senatorial bets dish out promises, vow to improve people’s welfare”), the Star published a photo of its staff posing with senatorial bet Edgardo Sonny Angara. There were several candidates mentioned in the article including Angara but he was the only candidate who appeared in the photo with the staff.

Although it had reports on Team UNA, Newslife’s reports focused mainly on Team PNoy’s senatorial candidates.

Political Ads

In the first two weeks, the political advertisements that appeared during the airing of news programs were for Ernesto Maceda, Richard “Dick” Gordon, Joseph Victor “JV” Ejercito, Madrigal, and Makabayan bet Teddy Casino.

Just like in 2007

The reporting during the first two weeks of the 2013 replicated media coverage of past elections. In CMFR’s monitor of the news media coverage of the 2007 midterm elections, the candidates from the administration and opposition parties who were already well-known were amply covered to the detriment of other senatorial candidates.

There was also very little coverage of the party-list elections in the first three weeks of the campaign in 2007, despite these elections’ being national in scope.

Will we see more of the same news media coverage this year that has characterized every election campaign?

- Nicole Marie T. Abania, Mary Anne V. Ablanida, Titus M. Calauor, and Sharmaine A. Ramos

Pols circumvent 120-minute political ad limit

Wednesday, May 5th, 2010 |

THE CMFR MONITOR OF MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE 2010 ELECTIONS
POLITICAL ADS IN BROADCASTING AND PRINT
(For the Period March 14 – 27)


Less than two months after the official campaign period for national elections started, AGB Nielsen, in partnership with the non-governmental organization Pera’t Pulitika, released a study that revealed that two presidential candidates exceeded the prescribed total airtime limit for advertisements per TV station.

As of Mar. 24, Nacionalista Party’s (NP) Manuel “Manny” Villar had aired a total of 128.25 minutes of political advertisements over GMA-7 and 129 minutes over ABS-CBN. The Liberal Party’s (LP) Benigno Simeon “Noynoy” Aquino Jr. had aired 118 minutes of political advertisements over GMA-7 and 129 minutes over ABS-CBN as of the same date.

Section 6 of the Fair Elections Act states that candidates must not have more than 120 minutes of airtime for television advertisements and 180 minutes for radio advertisements. The media did continuously report on this provision and had been monitoring the candidates’ advertisements, but the Comelec interpretation of the 120 minute airtime provision on television allowed moneyed candidates to air ads beyond that limit.

There were ample clues that the so-called limit would be practically meaningless. The Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility’s (CMFR) monitoring for the second period (Feb. 28 – Mar. 13) noted Akap-Bata party-list’s use of Villar’s campaign jingle in its television advertisements. First nominee Dr. Joy Alcantara denied that her organizatio had received funding from Villar, and said that it had merely   asked the candidate for permission to use his jingle to boost Akap’s own campaign. The Social Weather Stations April 16-19 Pre-election survey however, revealed that Akap-Bata did not even make it to the top 50 party-list groups the public will most likely vote.

CMFR observed a considerable increase in the number of political advertisements in its third monitoring period, most especially by the political parties. With the airtime limit fast approaching for individual candidates, it seemed that some of them had found a loophole in the rule.

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Media battlefield shrinks as candidates near 120 minute airtime limit

Tuesday, March 30th, 2010 |

THE CMFR MONITOR OF MEDIA COVERAGE OF THE 2010 ELECTIONS
POLITICAL ADS IN BROADCASTING AND PRINT
(For the Period February 28-March 13)

A month after the start of the official campaign period for the 2010 national elections,  several groups including  civil society and the media were  monitoring and publicizing the campaign expenditures of the candidates, most especially their spending on political advertisements.

An AC Nielsen study, for example, revealed that as of Mar. 16, three presidential candidates had only  about 40 minutes left of the 120-minute airtime limit for each television network mandated by the Commission on Elections (Comelec). By Mar. 8, Nacionalista Party’s (NP) Manuel “Manny” Villar Jr. had at least 40 minutes left of airtime on both GMA-7 and ABS-CBN 2. The Liberal Party’s (LP) Benigno  “Noynoy” Aquino III  had  only 44 minutes left on ABS-CBN 2 and 54 minutes on GMA-7. Pwersa ng Masang Pilipino’s (PMP) Joseph “Erap” Ejercito Estrada had 44 minutes of advertisement airtime left on ABS-CBN and 55 minutes on GMA-7.

With different groups closely following ad placements in the media, the Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR) observed in its second period  of monitoring political advertisements a notable decrease in advertisements, especially by the presidential candidates.

For the  period under review,  CMFR monitored the advertisements aired during the primetime block (six to 10 pm) of Manila-based television networks ABS-CBN 2, GMA-7 and NBN-4 from Mar. 1 to Mar. 12, excluding Saturdays and Sundays. ( A technical glitch in the recording of NBN-4’s Mar. 2 primetime block resulted in a 15-minute  gap in the monitor for the period.)

CMFR also monitored the political advertisements in the three major Manila daily broadsheets, namely the Philippine Daily Inquirer, The Philippine Star and the Manila Bulletin from Feb. 28 to Mar. 13.

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CMFR Monitor of Political Advertisements (February 9-27): The most moneyed candidates were also the most covered by television

Friday, March 12th, 2010 |

In 2004, relatively-unknown trade secretary Manuel “Mar” Roxas ran for senator. Spending 73% of his campaign finances on advertisements, Mr. Palengke, as his advertisements tagged him, made it to the Senate with the most votes.

After two attempts, unknown and holding no position in the government , Ma. Ana Consuelo “Jamby” Madrigal became a senator in 2004 after filling the airwaves and billboards with advertisements featuring popular actress Judy Ann Santos.

Roxas is currently running as vice-president under the Liberal Party, while Madrigal is running for president as an independent candidate.

In today’s media-driven world, political advertisements have become a crucial tool during an election campaign.

The Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR) monitored the advertisements aired during the primetime block (six to 10 pm) of Manila-based television networks ABS-CBN 2, GMA-7 and NBN-4 in the first three weeks of the campaign period, starting Feb. 9 to Feb. 26 excluding Saturdays and Sundays.

For print, CMFR monitored the advertisements published in the three major Manila daily broadsheets, namely the Philippine Daily Inquirer, Manila Bulletin, and The Philippine Star from Feb 10 to Feb 27.

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CMFR Monitor of the News Media Coverage of 2013 Elections

Given the special nature of the 2013 campaign and elections, the media’s role as credible and critical sources of information and analysis during the election season bears watching. The Center for Media Freedom and Responsibility (CMFR) is monitoring the news media coverage of the 2013 campaign and elections in the context of both the special circumstances in which they were taking place, and the opportunity for improved and meaningful reporting and analysis the exercise offered to the Philippine media. 

CMFR has been monitoring media coverage of Philippine elections since 1992, and in every instance has made recommendations towards the improvement of media coverage. These efforts have not been unrewarded. Changes in media coverage incorporating some of the recommendations of the CMFR monitor in 2004 were evident, for example, in the media coverage of the 2007 elections.


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